Disagree, but don't be disagreeable

To the editor:

After reading Robert Hudson’s Jan. 9 letter to the editor, “‘Stupid’ reigns again in Congress,” I am reminded of the axiom, “Name calling, after all, is the last refuge of a mouth — or brain — running on empty.”

Congress certainly deserves criticism during any era; even Will Rogers once quipped, “All I had to do to make the people die laughing was to talk about what the Congress was doing.” But Hudson’s brand of ridicule often tends to be up close and personal and reserved for Democrats. It is not my intent herein to counter his specific examples, but to suggest that he raise his level of criticism and include Republicans and the president who, after all, have been in complete control of all three branches of government until Jan. 3. Has Hudson been sleep during the thousands of lies uttered by President Trump? I fear that he is mirroring the president’s example.

Wasn’t it President Reagan, the Great Communicator, who said, “We can disagree without being disagreeable”?

GERALD N. DAVIS

Chatham

Changing day of worship

To the editor:

The worship day was changed from the Sabbath Day to the Lord’s Day, which is the first day of the week (Sunday), after the Jews crucified Jesus Christ, Colossians 2:14. This was over 250 years before the Roman Emperor Constantine. This is written in the book of Acts around the year 64 A.D.; upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them. Acts 20:7. The book of Acts was written around 64 A.D., and the New Testament was finished around 95 A.D. You see it was God who made the switch, not man.

The Law of Moses, including the Ten Commandments as a way of life ended with the death of Jesus Christ. From the book of Hebrews we can find the superiority of the New Testament, it incorporates the principles of the Ten Commandments and did away with Saturday worship. It was nailed to the cross. If you read Hebrews 8:5-13 and Hebrews 10:4, you can read where it was established upon better promises.

The Apostle Paul wrote this in the book of 1 Corinthians 14:33, “For God is not the author of confusion.” It only gets confused when man tries to mix his doctrines with the word of God.

GLENN G. ALLEN

Danville

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